greybanshee:

mucholderthen:

EMBROIDERED HEART AND LUNGSAndrea DezsöOne-of-a-kind hand-made embroidery: cotton thread on white cotton canvas, 2004  |||  SOURCE:  Andrea Dezso Illustration)
A heart, on valentines day or any other time, does much better with lungs attached.

This is so gorgeous. I could stare at this for days.

greybanshee:

mucholderthen:

EMBROIDERED HEART AND LUNGS
Andrea Dezsö
One-of-a-kind hand-made embroidery: cotton thread on white cotton canvas, 2004  |||  SOURCE:  Andrea Dezso Illustration)

A heart, on valentines day or any other time,
does much better with lungs attached.

This is so gorgeous. I could stare at this for days.

expertcosmotips:

date him if he’s this boat

expertcosmotips:

date him if he’s this boat

(Source: memewhore)

oldtobegin:

lastbutnotleast:

vanityfair:

It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World | Mad Men's Kiernan Shipka
Photograph by Williams and Hirakawa. 

I want that dress so bad it made my eyes hurt.

THIS LOOK

oldtobegin:

lastbutnotleast:

vanityfair:

It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World | Mad Men's Kiernan Shipka

Photograph by Williams and Hirakawa. 

I want that dress so bad it made my eyes hurt.

THIS LOOK

the-overlook-hotel:

In Vivian Kubrick’s documentary on the making of The Shining, several crew members can be seen wearing a black sweater with “The Shining" in red letters, and a white hawk hovering above the text. The hawk is a nod to Kubrick’s production company, "Hawk Films Ltd."

These custom sweaters were given as gifts by actor Jack Nicholson to everyone on the crew during the production. 

oh my GOD i want one

abloodymess:

thewomanofkleenex:

abloodymess:

thewomanofkleenex:

oldbonesanddust:

bombsfall:

The tide of 90s nostalgia continues to rise, so I thought I’d break this out again to set the record straight.

Instead of tumblr’ing, groups of us all hung out at Dennys or the Kettle so we could smoke cigarettes (yes inside!) and talk about the alternative music we had heard rumors of and write in journals.

I don’t buy the first one. I didn’t listen to much independent music, but I listened to a little bit, because (a) even in rural areas, teenagers make bands and go play shows with other bands (b) people move in and out of areas, bringing their music with them (c) Rolling Stone used to actually review a really interesting assortment of stuff in its back pages, which is how I wound up listening to Yo La Tengo and begging my parents to take me to Dallas to see Welcome to the Dollhouse — we couldn’t make it before it left the theater, but the local video store was actually amazing, so I just rented it later.

Being from a fucking country podunk town (granted we are 50 miles from Chicago, but when you are 11-15 it feels like forever away) we still managed to know about “cool” things. If you were really interested in something (music, photography, film, skateboarding) you hunted it down. The people with outside interests sorta banded together in my school and shared info and turned each other on to other stuff (without the internet!). If you had no interest in popular culture at a time without the internet you had to work a bit harder to find alternatives, but they were there. Tape trades, writing to zines and distros and bands! Talking to people at the record store. Even in my little town I could get my hands on cool little film quarterlies and find and read about awesome films. Sure it was harder to see some films, and it wasn’t instant, but there was a big VHS trading network available; that’s how I saw some early Buñuel films and Warhol stuff. 
The internet really didn’t change everything so much. It just changed how we do it.

Yes! “Viral” videos predate the internet, or we wouldn’t have the glory that is the exploding whale video or the Winnebago man. I was in a really culturally deprived area, and like, my tastes weren’t that sophisticated or great, but I still knew enough to go to the used record store to find old, interesting stuff or to ransack the library for weird sci fi. Assuming people can’t find cool things when those things aren’t handed to them on a platter does such a disservice.

YES! I forgot just how awesome the library was to finding things. So many cool sci-fi and monster film books. Weird relics from the 60s and 70s. Old magazines. So much good stuff can be found even in the small town library. 

I would take copies of Spin out from the local library and tear out pictures of Thom Yorke to hang on my walls

abloodymess:

thewomanofkleenex:

abloodymess:

thewomanofkleenex:

oldbonesanddust:

bombsfall:

The tide of 90s nostalgia continues to rise, so I thought I’d break this out again to set the record straight.

Instead of tumblr’ing, groups of us all hung out at Dennys or the Kettle so we could smoke cigarettes (yes inside!) and talk about the alternative music we had heard rumors of and write in journals.

I don’t buy the first one. I didn’t listen to much independent music, but I listened to a little bit, because (a) even in rural areas, teenagers make bands and go play shows with other bands (b) people move in and out of areas, bringing their music with them (c) Rolling Stone used to actually review a really interesting assortment of stuff in its back pages, which is how I wound up listening to Yo La Tengo and begging my parents to take me to Dallas to see Welcome to the Dollhouse — we couldn’t make it before it left the theater, but the local video store was actually amazing, so I just rented it later.

Being from a fucking country podunk town (granted we are 50 miles from Chicago, but when you are 11-15 it feels like forever away) we still managed to know about “cool” things. If you were really interested in something (music, photography, film, skateboarding) you hunted it down. The people with outside interests sorta banded together in my school and shared info and turned each other on to other stuff (without the internet!). If you had no interest in popular culture at a time without the internet you had to work a bit harder to find alternatives, but they were there. Tape trades, writing to zines and distros and bands! Talking to people at the record store. Even in my little town I could get my hands on cool little film quarterlies and find and read about awesome films. Sure it was harder to see some films, and it wasn’t instant, but there was a big VHS trading network available; that’s how I saw some early Buñuel films and Warhol stuff. 

The internet really didn’t change everything so much. It just changed how we do it.

Yes! “Viral” videos predate the internet, or we wouldn’t have the glory that is the exploding whale video or the Winnebago man. I was in a really culturally deprived area, and like, my tastes weren’t that sophisticated or great, but I still knew enough to go to the used record store to find old, interesting stuff or to ransack the library for weird sci fi. Assuming people can’t find cool things when those things aren’t handed to them on a platter does such a disservice.

YES! I forgot just how awesome the library was to finding things. So many cool sci-fi and monster film books. Weird relics from the 60s and 70s. Old magazines. So much good stuff can be found even in the small town library. 

I would take copies of Spin out from the local library and tear out pictures of Thom Yorke to hang on my walls

oldtobegin:

wesleyaccola:

Jaime fuckin’ Lannister

i was waiting for this gif

oldtobegin:

wesleyaccola:

Jaime fuckin’ Lannister

i was waiting for this gif

(Source: endling81)

mrgabe88:

Victorian era house in Angeleno Heights, Los Angeles

mrgabe88:

Victorian era house in Angeleno Heights, Los Angeles

sea-of-bitterness:

Anyone know who did the art on this? I’m on mobile at work so it’s kinda hard to go sleuthing.

(Source: th3motherfuck)

lunacylover:

Piotr Stachiewicz (Polish, 1858-1938)

12 months - full set from “Boży rok”, where each illustration was based on proverbs and saints associated with the month.

(Source: parashutov.livejournal.com)